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Undergraduate Theory & Musicology Electives Spring 2015

Temperament and Western Tuning Since 1900

MU 319-01
Credits: 2
Prequisite: Harmony & Counterpoint 4
Meeting: Monday 11:00–12:50
Instructor: James Dalton

Course Description

A history of the many tuning systems utilized in Western music beginning with equal temperament and including quarter tones and other smaller equal divisions, the Bohlen-Pierce scale and extended just intonation. We will explore the music and theories of Carrillo, Ives, Haba, Partch, Johnston, Stockhausen, and others.


 

TBD

MU 319-02
Credits: 2
Prequisite: Harmony & Counterpoint 4
Meeting: Monday 11:00–12:50
Instructor:

Course Description




Atonal Ear Training

MU 319-03
Credits: 2
Prerequisite: Ear Training 4
Meetings: Monday and Wednesday 11:00–11:50
Instructor: Dr. Stephen Halloran 

Course Description
This course is based primarily on the non-tonal vocal works of Debussy, Schoenberg, Berg, Ives, Bartok, Stravinsky, and Webern. This literature, as well as Edlund’s Modus Novus, will provide a structured and comprehensive instruction in solfège, dictation and oral analysis.



Fugue

MU 319-04
Credits: 2
Prerequisite: Harmony & Counterpoint 4
Meeting: Tuesday 11:00–12:50
Instructor: Dr. Stephen Halloran

Course Description
The objectives specific to this course include the ability to understand, describe, analyze, diagram and discuss various applications of fugal counterpoint while demonstrating comprehension of specific techniques by writing imitative passages. These skills will be achieved through a study of fugue in the works of Handel, Bach, Scarlatti, Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Bartók, Hindemith, and Stravinsky.

 


Transcriptions of American Popular Music

MU 319-05
Credits: 2
Prerequisite: Harmony & Counterpoint 4
Meeting: Tuesday 11:00–12:50
Instructor: John Murphree 

Course Description
This course uses 20th century popular music of England and The United States as source material for weekly transcription assignments. Performances of student transcriptions are also used in a classroom setting to assess accuracy and approach to transcription. Lectures will focus on listening and notational techniques for particular instruments, instrument groups, or genres.

 

Walls of Sound

MU 319-06
Credits: 2
Prerequisite: Harmony & Counterpoint 4
Meeting: Wednesday 11:00–12:50
Instructor: Dr. Curtis Hughes

Course Description
The course will be an overview of various approaches to constructing/organizing harmonically and texturally dense ensemble musical textures, as originated by European and American composers from the 1950s through the present. After an introductory unit on selected music of Edgard Varèse, Alban Berg and other early 20th-century antecedents, the focal point of the course will be major orchestral and large ensemble scores from the 1950s through the 1970s with a particular emphasis on music by Witold Lutoslawski, Krzysztof Penderecki, Iannis Xenakis, György Ligeti and Elliott Carter. The course includes an examination of the aspects of this body of music that are in reaction to integral serialism and early electronic music, as well as the influence of this music on later generations. The last part of the semester will include consideration of composers affiliated with spectralism including Gérard Grisey and Kaija Saariaho.

 

Traditional Music in the United States

MU 319-07
Credits: 2 
Prerequisite: Harmony & Counterpoint 4 
Meeting: Wednesday 11:00–12:50
Instructor: James Dalton 

Course Description
This course will focus on the music of various ethic and immigrant groups in the US including Anglo-Celtic, African-American, Native American, Latino, Cajun etc. and how they have come to define what we think of as American music.

 
 

Mahler: Music, Life, and Times

MU 319-08
Credits: 2
Prerequisite: Harmony & Counterpoint 4
Meeting: Tuesday 11:00–12:50
Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Abbate 

Course Description
This comprehensive study of Mahler’s music will move chronologically through his symphonies. We will consider his changing musical language and his redefinition of the 19th century symphony, along with the beliefs that shaped his early symphonies, his relationship with Alma Mahler, the “three blows of Fate” and their aftermath, and finally the lyric, idyllic acceptance of the Ninth Symphony.



TBD

MU 319 09
Credits: 2
Prerequisite: Harmony & Counterpoint 4
Meeting: Wednesday 11:00–12:50
Instructor:

Course Description



Score Reading 2

MU 319-10
Credits: 2 
Prerequisite: Score Reading 1, or permission
Meetings: Tuesday and Thursday 9:00–9:50
Instructor: James Dalton

Course Description
From playing minuets and trio movements from symphonies of Mozart and Haydn at the keyboard, the course materials increase in harmonic and rhythmic complexity; more-varied transposing instruments and larger forces are encountered as the semester progresses. The aim of this course is for students to be able to read a late Romantic and an early 20th-century orchestral score at the keyboard.

 

 

 

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