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The Boston Conservatory Presents Mozart's Don Giovanni

(BOSTON) The Boston Conservatory presents Mozart’s Don Giovanni March 29—31, at 8 p.m. and April 1 at 2 p.m. at The Boston Conservatory Theater, 31 Hemenway St., in Boston’s Fenway neighborhood. Press night is March 29. Director of Opera Studies Johnathon Pape directs. Conducted by Andrew Altenbach. Sung in Italian with English surtitles. Tickets are $25 general admission, $15 for seniors and $10 for all students with valid ID, and are available by phone at 617-912-9222 or at http://bostonconservatory.ticketforce.com/. 

Considered by some to be the greatest opera ever composed, Don Giovanni is based on the 17th century story of Don Juan. Mozart’s bold, beguiling blend of comedy and drama tells the tale of a well-known philanderer with a long list of amorous conquests. This dark, ironic comedy portrays the exploits of this irresistible young nobleman who seduces, abuses, and outrages everyone else in the cast, until he encounters something he cannot kill, beat up, dodge or outwit.

This production is supported in part by a generous grant from the Mattina R. Proctor Foundation.

Known as a director, writer, teacher, coach and frequent consultant for artistic projects spanning many disciplines, Johnathon Pape joined The Boston Conservatory in the fall of 2011 as director of opera studies. As a director, Pape's career spans theater, musical theater and opera, and he has staged a wide range of productions throughout the U.S. and abroad. Recent work includes La Traviata for Tulsa Opera; La Fille du Régiment for Dayton Opera; Le Nozze di Figaro, The Secret Garden, Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice and Lee Hoiby’s This Is The Rill Speaking (original cast recording on Albany Records) for Eastman Opera Theatre. Career highlights include the world premiere of Griffelkin by Lukas Foss for New York City Opera; the U.S. premiere of Daniel Catán’s La Hija da Rappaccini for San Diego Opera; the Los Angeles premiere of Richard Greenberg’s Eastern Standard; Terrence McNally’s Master Class for HaBimah, the National Theater of Israel; Leoš Janáek’s The Cunning Little Vixen and Richard Strauss’ Ariadne auf Naxos for Tulsa Opera; Brian Friel’s Molly Sweeney for an Irish Arts Festival; the Los Angeles premiere of Shirley Lauro’s A Piece of My Heart, about the women who served in Vietnam—a special installation production mounted in the Los Angeles National Cemetery; and Stephen Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd for Skylight Opera Theatre in Milwaukee. His directorial credits also include such diverse productions as The Taming of the Shrew, Dialogues of the Carmelites, Evita, La Bohème, Tartuffe, Ain’t Misbehavin’, Don Giovanni, Trelawney of the “Wells," Street Scene and The Most Happy Fella. Pape has frequently participated in the development of new works, directing workshops of Josephine, a musical about the life of Josephine Baker, and PoeSCrypt, a musical about the mysterious circumstances surrounding the death of Edgar Allan Poe. He has a special affinity for the Czech repertoire, having received a Fulbright Research Grant in opera and theater to the Czech Republic in 1994. Pape recently served as associate director of Eastman Opera Theatre at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.

Andrew Altenbach is one of the rising conductors and musical leaders of his generation. Recent guest conducting engagements have included the Memphis and Milwaukee Symphony Orchestras, as well as a continued cover conductor relationship with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO). After two very successful seasons with the St.Cloud Symphony Orchestra, Altenbach assumed his new appointment as music director of opera studies at The Boston Conservatory in the fall of 2011. Last summer, Altenbach was the associate conductor of the world-renowned Grand Teton Music Festival under Maestro Donald Runnicles. He has conducted the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Minneapolis Musical Offering Series and Brevard Music Center Orchestra. Altenbach has held previous posts as music director for the North Shore Chamber Orchestra, principal guest conductor of the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra, assistant conductor to the Evanston Symphony and conducting fellow of the prestigious Chautauqua Institution. Equally comfortable in the opera pit, Altenbach recently guest conducted at Opera Birmingham, Indiana University Opera Theatre and the Temple University Opera Theatre. After making his international debut conducting La bohème at Opera Africa in Johannesburg, he returned there in the summer of 2011 to conduct Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro. He has been the associate conductor of Central City Opera for the past two seasons, conducting numerous performances and serving as the company’s chorus master. For two seasons, he was associate conductor of the Minnesota Opera, giving numerous performances and serving as the company chorus master. He also music directed Die Entführung aus dem Serail with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and Minnesota Opera to rave reviews. Recently, Altenbach served on the conducting/coaching staffs of the Santa Fe Opera, Music Academy of the West, Cincinnati Opera and San Francisco Opera Merola Program, in addition to guest conducting for the Milwaukee Opera Theatre and Opera on the James. At Indiana University, Altenbach became the first student in the school’s history to music direct for the opera department, and his conducting of Cosi fan tutte earned him recognition in Opera Now magazine under "Who's Hot."

About The Boston Conservatory

The Boston Conservatory trains exceptional young performing artists for careers that enrich and transform the human experience. Known for its intimate and supportive multi-disciplinary environment, The Boston Conservatory offers fully accredited graduate and undergraduate programs in music, dance and musical theater, and presents more than 200 performances each year by students, faculty and guest artists. Since its founding in 1867, The Boston Conservatory has shared its talent and creativity with the city of Boston, the region and the nation, and continues to grow today as a vibrant community of artists and educators. For more information, visit www.bostonconservatory.edu.

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